Act 2: You're On!

The Art of Networking: It's All About Giving, with Michael Whitehouse

December 27, 2021 Kate, Rhonda & Linda Season 1 Episode 19
Act 2: You're On!
The Art of Networking: It's All About Giving, with Michael Whitehouse
Show Notes Transcript

Meet Michael Whitehouse is “The Guy Who Knows A Guy” - a connector, mindset coach, and motivational speaker. Over the years, he worked a variety of jobs in sales and other fields, but you’ll learn how COVID  gave him the push to finally follow his calling to help people live their best lives. Through his Morning Motivation Podcast, his books, including The Guy Who Knows A Guy, and his coaching, he helps people use three pillars: values, vision, and gratitude to share their greatness with the world.

In this great conversation, Michael explains how he learned to be a more effective networker in a very short amount of time and now teaches others to do the same. Michael also shares the how-to’s of assembling a toolbox of strategies and exercises to help you clarify your values and to specify your goals. He himself has a deep treasure chest of resources from his vast network and he also has a broad business background from which he guides clients in the right direction. As “The Guy Who Knows a Guy,” Michael shares that it's all about connecting with people and finding a way to be of benefit to them. By focusing on what he can give, rather than what he can get, Listen in and hear how Michael has been able to create something quite spectacular in his business and also in his personal life.

Some highlights you will encounter in this podcast:

“It's way less expensive to hire a coach who can tell you 'I think that at the end of the road, you will find an alligator'. You know, instead of walking down the road yourself for six months, and then find the alligator yourself, to have the coach say there's an alligator at the end of that road. I've been down that, I know three other people have been down that and you can walk down it, but you should probably walk down this other road that does not contain an alligator at the end. That is priceless both in time and money.”

“And the biggest thing I've discovered - the through-line - throughout all - is mindset. In so many of the stories, the pivot point is a mindset shift, they change their internal identity that changes how they saw themselves.”

“The seeds of your superpower are often in your greatest weakness.”

“Being clear on what you're looking for. But once you're clear on that, you're like, “Hey, I'm looking for this exact person who can do this thing for me!” You can find them in a week. It's just a matter of letting people know…because someone knows.”

Find more info at
https://www.guywhoknowsaguy.com

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/a2yo)
Linda:

Greetings friends. I'm Linda Tighe and I have the great pleasure of podcasting today with my two co hosts,

Rhonda:

Rhonda Garvin Conway

Kate:

and I'm Kate Leavey and we are also joined by our talented producers, Susan Nagle, And Kathy Carswell.

Linda:

So today, we are very excited to have Michael Whitehouse here. I'm thrilled to talk to Michael. I've known him in the past, we work together, actually. But first, I just want to say to our listeners, let me ask you this, because the old saying is right time is money. Would you like to learn how to be a more effective networker in a very short amount of time? Do you ever think I would love to have a toolbox of strategies and exercises to help me clarify my values and specify my goals? You are going to love this conversation with Michael today. Michael Whitehouse has a treasure chest of resources from his vast network and abroad business background. This means that after you have clarified where you're trying to go, and what you're meant to do, Michael has the resources to guide you in the right direction to start going there. So let me give you a little bit of background. Michael Whitehouse is the guy who knows a guy I love that name. By the way, I think it's fabulous. He is a connector mindset coach and motivational speaker. Over the years he worked a variety of jobs in sales and other fields. But it's true Act Two, if you will happened during the pandemic. The COVID pandemic gave him the push to finally follow his calling to help people live their best lives. Through his morning motivation podcast, his books, including The Guy Who Knows a Guy, in his coaching, he helps people to use the three pillars of values, vision and gratitude to share their greatness with the world. As Michael says, it's all about connecting with people and finding a way to be of benefit to them. By focusing on what you can give, rather than what you can get, Michael has been able to create something quite spectacular. So welcome, Michael, thank you so much for being here this morning. And we would love to hear about that. Our podcast is about people reinventing making those transitions. So what made you make this? I mean, this is bold, what you're doing is so bold, and you just went for it. So I'd love to hear about that.

Michael Whitehouse:

Yeah, thanks for me. I was like like this in the bios. I'm like, Wow, this guy sounds great, I can't wait to meet him. Oh, that's me. Oh, wow, look at that. It's funny, you go through life and keep accumulating experience and, credentials. And you're like, I've got a lot of stuff, which I imagine is probably a lot of, you know, what your podcasts about talking those people who've been out there for for 20, 30 years. And that's that's the people I like to work with the best the ones who have been in maybe the corporate world or just sort of spinning their wheels for a couple decades. And now they're thinking, well, I guess I only have experience in this one field, not realizing they have related experiences to 20 other things. But yeah, so I made the transition, as you said, at the pandemic and I I'm not sure I'd say Act Two, maybe be like Act Five or Six. Actually, I launched a game store straight out of college, and that was kind of Act One, and then I went from there into sales and sort of wandered the the business world. And then came the pandemic, and it forced me to do the thing I really should have done years ago, which was build my own business because the business I had I was a community publisher, which actually, of course led to how we met. And that became untenable without in person networking. That's where most of my business was coming from. And my coaches are to pick up and I said, Well, what's like, I should do the thing I've always wanted to do, I guess if I have to follow my calling, I guess I can do that. And for the last year and a half, it's been a lot of exploration, a lot of meeting people, I estimate I've done five or 600 one-to-ones over the last year, including, you know, including podcasts, interviews on The Guy Who Knows a Guy podcast and, the amount that I've learned from all these people and, you know, between mindset concepts, and marketing concepts and technologies and tools and resources, has been really exciting and tremendous. And the biggest challenge has been figuring out what my focus is, who my audience is, what the offer is, you know, I've got a pile of resources. And the challenge I think this challenge for a lot of people, they have this pile of assets, who do they serve? How do you put it into a package? How do you make that be something so it's been a very evolutionary process. And what I've discovered is the person I can most serve is someone who's in my position, where they've got that pile of assets, and they know they can help someone, but they're not quite sure how or what the tools are they need and all that. So I bring all that together. I finally got frustrated trying to build a course or program which always has to have a specific outcome. So you know what, I'm just gonna launch a program called the Inner Circle, and you pay to get access to me, you can bring your challengers to a live zoom call, and I will answer them and I'll just go into whatever in the bucket I need, you know, bring the whole, the whole treasure chest and because I haven't structured it, I'm starting it out as a $47 a month program, which I know is way too cheap, but I don't have the marketing built around it. So it's it's like a rocket ship and a plain brown paper wrapper. Because I just want to start helping people, and then I'll figure out how to package it and make it a high ticket program and all that stuff later. But right now I just want to kind of get out there and start doing things for people.

Kate:

Hmm. We love your platform, this idea of connection, especially during the last few years, we realize connection is everything. And connecting and thinking first, how do I help? What's the benefit? How do I help the people I'm connecting with? I think that's a little that's a little different. And so how has that helped you be successful, which clearly, you have been in different a little bit different from the connectors and influencers out there?

Michael Whitehouse:

Well, I think that the big thing about that the whole givers gain concept is from Ivan Meisner, the founder of BNI. And it's the idea of you go into a networking, space and networking mission to give because if everyone goes to give everyone's going to gain. But if everyone goes to take, nobody gets anything. That's where you have those, we've probably all been that chamber event. It's all salespeople trying to sell to each other, and none of them are buyers. They're all sellers. And there's no no one. Nothing happens from that. But if everyone goes in saying who what can I give, what can I share? What can I introduce, the power of that is that people are willing to take your call, if you're there to give in exchange, who are not willing, take your call if you're if you take. And that's how on my podcast I've interviewed about roughly I, you know, I don't ask for a balanced statement, or I talk to them, but I think a dozen or so millionaires. And they're perfectly happy to talk to me and share their advice and share their wisdom and experience. And for podcasts, okay, they're trying to self promote, but I've had plenty of people who I've met who have been happy to get on a call with me, just me for 30, 60 minutes, just sharing their advice. And I know these are $2,000 an hour coaches, but successful people love to share as long as you're not trying to take from them. And if they understand something beneficial outcome of this, you know, I'm going to appreciate their help to me and I'm thinking alright, how can I help this guy? Who can I introduce them to. Who else can I help? And the powerful thing, so I think a lot of people out there say, Well, I don't have a network. I don't know anybody. You have, as soon as you start trying to network, you have a network. It happened early on in my networking life that I went to a chamber of commerce events. And I didn't know anyone in the room, I hardly knew anyone in the county. I talked to the first person, first person was a realtor. Second person, I don't remember, not relevant to the story. Third person I said, Who are you trying to meet? Who would you like to connect with? They said, Well, really, I need to need to connect with realtors. I said, do you know that realtor over there? They said no, no, I've never met them. Well come on over. I knew three people in the room, I connected the third one to the first one. And same thing happens once I started connecting with these, these high end coaches, the successful business people is I could talk to the third one and say, Hey, do you know this guy, I've interviewed my podcast here, you can check out the episode. Listen to the story if you'd like I'll introduce you. And now suddenly, I'm punching above my weight because I'm introducing this person up here to this person up here. And now they're appreciating like, Wow, you're really a connector there. I may only know the three of them, or the two of them. But but you know, I'm connecting the one to the other. And now they're thinking, how can I return this favor? How can I help out it's all about, it's not about saying I'm going to give because I expect you to give back. It's more about I'm going to give because I expected to come back. And if everyone thinks that way, then everyone ends up better off.

Rhonda:

I love that. And something else you said earlier Michael, is about that Fifth Act. I think that really resonates for people. That is the human experience, right? We're constantly in a state of change, more than we are not changing. And the other piece that's so informative for us that you mentioned, is how we tap into resources. Now, you've mentioned you're a coach, I know as a coach that that's a vital resource in people's lives, But I think there are many who don't know about coaching. So could you enlighten us on what does that mean to be a coach and how that might be a beneficial resource for people in their world?

Michael Whitehouse:

Absolutely, yeah. One of the challenges is that coach means about 36 different things. So if people are confused it's not because they're they're not savvy in business is because they may have met four coaches who meant the words mean different things. Some people they say coach, but they mean trainer. Some people say coach, and they mean mentor. Some people say coach, and honestly I don't use it 100% in the I think the truest you know the International Coaching Federation definition, because the quintessential coach is is more like the Freudian therapist who comes in and extracts your draws forth your wisdom from yourself, doesn't give any advice, asks a series of questions to walk you down a path that's more of a transformational coach. I'm trained in that toolset. That's not primarily what I do. But a coach is someone who helps you to be your best self and move down your road. Now, this could be the pure transformational type coach who does it all through drawing out your own answers, and asking questions and developing your mindset. And it's all it's all kind of within, you unlock your potential. Sometimes, you have specifically like a marketing coach. Which is more of a marketing strategist very often, but they'll call themselves a coach, because that's the cool word. And that's more of a technical person, they're developing your marketing strategy, and they're doing this and that. Then, the challenge for someone who's new in business is they say, Oh, I have a coach, but their coach is a marketing coach, or their coach is, a financial coach, or their coach is a tactician, not someone at the strategy level or even at the higher level. So, when I talk to really successful people, they'll tell me they have 5, 6, 10, 12 coaches. So there's certainly no "I have a coach". You could say your coaching budget is spent, "I don't have any more money to spend on a coach", but there's all kinds of different things you can use a coach for. And what the space I'm trying to move into is sort of the general coach, the sideline coach, because what I've found lacking is most of them tend to be specialists. Secialists tend to be where the money is, just like with a doctor, you know, general practitioner makes less than a cardiologist or a neurologist or brain surgeon or whatever, and same with a coach. If you're a a marketing coach and you've zeroed in on you do this exact part of marketing, you make more money than the 'I help people build their business, generally". But what I think the need is, you know, when I was getting started in this, I hired a couple coaches, but they were very specific. And so great, I got this very specific tactical skill, but I didn't know who my avatar was, I didn't know who my target was, I didn't know what I was offering, I didn't have a program, but I could build a great email list. And, you know, I was really good at this one very specific skill. But I didn't have the rest of the big picture. So, what I'm trying to do with my my Inner Circle, and my coaching, is to kind of be that sideline coach who someone can come to me and say, okay, so I found this coach, they seem really great. Here's their program, should I do it? And I can ask questions like, what will that do for you? What is your big picture goal? What's going to, you know, what are you going to get when you complete that course. And then they realize, oh, oh, yeah, I need to plug this, this and this in to get that. And so you know, a coach is vital, it is nearly impossible to be successful without a coach or a mentor, which is often a mentor is a coach who works for free. You know, someone who's who's a friend, or they're there in the industry or whatever. But without someone to guide you to simply trial and error, your way to success is a very long and expensive road. And that's, that's the point I want to make is some people say, I can't afford a coach, you know, a coach might be, depending on the coach $300-$500, $1,000 a month, some are, you know, $2,000 a month, and then they'd say I can't afford $500 a month for a coach that's too expensive. Well, can you afford to spend $30,000 through trial and error to figure it out? You know, I can't afford a marketing coach, but you can afford $1,000 a month on Facebook ads that don't work? It's cheaper to hire a marketing expert, than to experiment it yourself, because they already experimented. They've they've already burned $50,000 on things that don't work. So they can get to the things that do work. And same thing with the coach is that generalist coach like me or someone who does what I do, at a few $100 a month can save you 1000s on buying the wrong programs and hiring the wrong people and going down blind alleys. And it's way less expensive to hire a coach who can tell you 'I think that at the end of the road, you will find an alligator'. You know, instead of walking down the road yourself for six months, and then find the alligator yourself, to have the coach say there's an alligator at the end of that road. I've been down that, I know three other people have been down that and you can walk down it, but you should probably walk down this other road that does not contain an alligator at the end. That is priceless both in time and money.

Kate:

Oh, this conversation already is so chock full of wisdom. I'm learning a ton. This is great for our listeners, great for us. I've heard you say that you interview people to learn stuff. That's what we feel like too, it's a benefit to our audience, for sure. But we just feel so grateful to have these amazing conversations. So what stuff have you learned? So maybe you can start by telling us a little bit about your podcast? The Guy Who Knows a Guy, which is just the greatest title. You're in season three, that's exciting.

Michael Whitehouse:

Yes, yes. So I have two podcasts. One is the morning motivation podcast; at morningmotivation.fund, which is a quick hit of motivation, which I made it to put into a slot that people aren't already using that two to five minutes in the morning to wake up. But The Guy Who Knows a Guy podcast my more in depth podcast, where I do the interviews. And season one was about showing off my network. I'm the guy who knows a guy let me bring people on here. I brought the president local bank, local police chief, you know all these people that say, Wow, you're so well connected! Look at your guests. Season two, I was running a conference last year, and I wanted to show off the guests, we're gonna have the conference. And so that was Season Two, and Season Three, I went to Strategic Alliance Live, I met all these seven, eight figure business people. And I said they're doing something. They're smart, I'm probably as smart as they are. But they're further down the road. I want to know what their- they're not secrets, but you know what they did? Why don't I do a podcast? because I'm sure they tell me, you know, they get on on the phone tell me, but why don't I record it and share it with people? So that's what Season Three is about is finding successful people, bringing them on the show, and saying, "How'd you do it? What was your story?" And the biggest thing I've discovered, the through-line throughout - is mindset. So many of the stories, the pivot point is a mindset shift, they change their internal identity that change how they saw themselves. Now, sometimes the mindset shift was hitting rock bottom. A surprising number of the millionaires and successful people I've interviewed on my podcast, talk about considering suicide, attempting suicide, you know, getting to that point where they hit rock bottom. Because when you get to that point, you throw away all your assumptions. You know, if you're willing to swallow a bottle of pills, well, quitting your job and starting a business doesn't seem like quite as big a step anymore. And so I think for a lot of people, we put these limitations Oh, I can't quit my job, oh, I can't make cold calls, oh, I can't, you know, network, I can't write a book, I can't do a podcast. I can't, I can't, I can't. And once you hit that point, where you're willing to do something really, truly reckless, you know, truly over the top, and you're like, well, starting a podcast doesn't really seem that shocking anymore. I guess I can probably figure out how to make that one work now. And but it drew me they didn't get to that point, but there's there was some point at which they said, Enough is enough. I'm going to do this, I'm going to and, and not all of them. But but that was kind of the the main thing that I found is getting out of their own way, throwing out all the assumptions, being willing to do something truly new. And the other one was discovering that the seeds of your superpower are often in your greatest weakness. So, whatever your worst out there, like that's holding me back, look there, and in that you'll find it. So, for me, for example, its lack of focus, as you may have noticed, I'm kind of over here and over there. As a friend of mine says "squirreling out", and so keeping, like, you know, I've, I've never had a regular corporate job. I don't think I've ever held a job for more than three years. So I'm over here, I'm over there I'm meeting these people. I'm trying this and trying that. And I was like, Oh, this is holding me back and then I realized that's why I've met with 2000 entrepreneurs, experts and authorities and learned from them. And now I've got this encyclopedic knowledge, which I didn't- someone said encyclopedic, I'm like, that's perfect. Because I have everything in my head. No more than three paragraphs on anything. Just like the encyclopedia. I have just three paragraphs, on everything. We just got a dog. I'm not a dog person. I don't know anything about well, I don't wanna say I don't know anything. I've never had a dog. I never expected to get a dog. My wife wanted a dog, so we got a dog. I took her for a walk the first time, and I knew from having met with dog trainers and talked to people about dogs, I knew how to manage a dog on a leash for the first time I'd ever done it with a 103 pound dog, because three paragraphs about everything in my head, including how to manage a dog, and so now I can deploy what had been a weakness, being unfocused and squirreling all over the place, as a strength. I can be a coach, and whatever you're coming up against. I've heard of it. I've seen it. I've been, I've heard that story at some point. And so no matter what they're saying, you know, people say, Oh, you probably don't understand this. But here's my situation like, oh, yeah, no, I totally know about that. Yeah, absolutely. And people bring up the most, because I look like a boring old white guy. Right? You know, people look at me and, and then they probably don't look at me and say, I bet that guy was the director of Rocky Horror Picture Show cast. But I was, you know, "I've been that guy on the game store!"- no. But you know, I've got all these different things in my background. You know, I have all these connections with the Renaissance Fair community, I have all these different things that you wouldn't expect, because I've been a squirrel running everywhere for 20 years. So for your listeners, whatever it is, you think is holding you back, "Oh, I've only worked in the corporate world for the same company for 20 years". Okay, well, how can that be a strength? You know, "I was a stay at home mom for 20 years". Well, how can that be a strength, because you'll learn something. In fact, if you're a stay at home mom for 20 years, you probably have more people skills than most Harvard educated managers, because you can handle children, which is a really valuable skill in managing a team, because your team is just older children.

Linda:

Absolutely. Amen to that. Absolutely. I really like that you are talking about this, Michael. I love the encyclopedia with three paragraphs on every topic because I think a lot of us feel that way, and I certainly have felt that way. Whenever people ask me about my background, I feel a little bit of embarrassmen and I say I say my new word is, it's eclectic. Because I haven't stayed in one place. Like, because I have lots of interesting things are very interesting, so it feels like a weakness. So, it's really wonderful to hear you and confirming to hear you say that actually, that can be a strength. And it means that, you know, you can be a good networker, and you have lots of skills. And I like the way you talk about having that arsenal of knowledge and skills. And you know, what would you say to the person who does have all that? And then they have this like little "Oh, but I would really like to do this, but I'm not really sure that I can". How do you take that first step forward and have the confidence to do that?

Michael Whitehouse:

So the first question, I always ask someone, because usually it starts with I'm here and don't like it, not where they want to be where they don't want to be. So I always ask them "If money were no object, what would you do?" And it's almost never "Well, I'd just live in the mountains". People still want to do something. If you're stressed out enough, you want to not do something for a while, but then you decompress. So what would you do the rest of your life if money was no object? And the answer to that is where you need to go. Now, the answer to that could be something crazy, like I want to ride dragons, okay, well, there's no dragons, so you can't ride them. Sorry to disappoint anyone who thinks that dragons are real. But whatever it is, if you say, Oh, I really want to do X, imagine it's possible, and now work it backwards. So if you really want to, you know, if you've always wanted to be a hairstylist, okay, imagine it's possible, picture what that life would look like, and now work backwards, what would it take to get there from here, and what you often realize is, oh, I just have to go to school or meet these people or, because the other thing to remember is almost anything you want to do, someone on earth has the power to make it happen. You know, I want to launch a tech company, it would take $20 million to lunch. Okay, well, all you need is someone with $20 million. And so then you're thinking, Okay, I need to find someone with $20 million, I need to give them a reason to give me their $20 million. It's that simple, and that complicated. But, I think we often think like, oh, I don't have 20 million plus, you don't have $20 million, nobody who started a tech company has the money. Now often they have some money, because they need to get on planes and fly to meet people and whatnot. But I interviewed a real estate investor named David Haberfield, on my podcast, and one thing he pointed out is, everyone knows someone with money. I don't care who you are, where you live, you know, you could live in, maybe if you live in a poor village in New Guinea, you might not know anyone money. But if you're anywhere in the if you if you're within the sound of my voice, you know someone with money. It might be your boss, it might be your neighbor, it might be your landlord, it might be your teacher's spouse, but someone you know, has what you consider an absurdly large amount of money. And if you can give them a reason, they will invest it. They've got their money, people that have money have it all over the place. Like they put it in, they put it in restaurants, they put it in houses, and a lot of these investments, the way that wealthy people make money isn't that every place they put their money turns to gold, They win more often than they lose. So, if somebody invests in a restaurant, they're probably taking a 50/50 shot. They know it's a 50/50 shot they're gonna lose this money, so they put in money they're willing to lose. So if you can go to that person, say, "Hey, I've got this idea, and I think it's pretty solid, and I think it's, you know, a good 60% chance, success, maybe even 70. You know, with your help, it could be 75", partner with them. Oftentimes, when people have money, what they don't have is time. So if you can bring them an idea that's pretty solid, and say, "With your money and my time and energy, we can together do That's so valuable, and I think what I heard, and all of that is something." So there's always a way, I talk about money, because that's often the thing that people point to and say, "Oh, I don't have that", but whatever it is, you can get it. Now, it may not make sense at that point your life. I was talking to that opportunity to look at our own mindset and ask those someone who's she's 63, she spent 20 years or 30 years in, in technology sales, and she was thinking about becoming a nurse, her husband pointed out like, do you want to spend four years and $50,000 to get your degree that you'll have by the time you're important questions to get the clarity to then execute the 66? And then you can start being a nurse? And she's like, Yeah, it might not make sense. You know, there's there's not enough time left on the clock to do that, and, and also, that's when plans that are often very simple. They require hard work, she realized that wasn't her driving passion. If she always wanted to be a nurse, she'd figure out a way to make it work. But that tells me it's like, yeah, it seemed like good idea, but it's not really, not really what I really want. But dedication, commitment, but with the right mindset, the doors you know, whatever it is you want to do, those resources exist, once you decide to find them. You'll find them, and even if you have no idea, just start telling people. Tell your friends, tell your neighbors, tell your boss, tell your co open to allow us to focus on that thing. You have shared a workers, tell people you meet in the grocery store. You know, I got this idea and all I need to do is find someone who can code websites. If I could find a partner who could code a many other things in this conversation. That was something website, I could launch this thing, it's pretty cool. And you tell that to 10 people and someone's gonna say, Oh, I got a friend who codes websites just quit his job and is looking for something to do. Oh, really, it's amazing how short a time it that really resonated for me, and I think for friends who are takes, once you're clear on what you're looking for, that's the hard part for for me and Linda, probably for you too. Being clear on what you're looking for. But once you're clear on that, you're like, Hey, I'm looking for this exact person listening as well. But this is one of my favorite parts of our who can do this thing for me, you can find them in a week. It's just a matter of letting people know because someone knows. podcast where we get to hear from you that that one thing, if you could offer our golden nugget, to those who are listening, who are looking to launch their next great thing. What is it that you would would share with them at this point? So the most important thing is knowing and having a clear vision of what you want to do. Once you have that clear vision, everything else will follow from that. And that's the biggest challenge, and to realize that having a clear one target doesn't exclude everything else, it allows you to get the one thing. So a lot of people make the mistake of saying I can help everybody, well, that's great, but everybody is nobody, nobody can refer you to everybody. So come up with a specific person you can help, a specific product want to make first. And once you're done with that one thing, then you can share that, you know, I help 43 year old women who have been working in the IT field for the last 15 or 16 years, who are between 5'4" and 5'7". So if you know anyone like that, that's who I can help. When you zero in that way, that's how you're going to build that initial hurdle. And you can build from that. And then you can help, then you can help you know the next group and the next group and the next group. But by having that very clear focus, that's the thing that's most powerful. And this is certainly, you know, full disclosure is definitely a something I have learned, and something I am learning to execute myself because the closer I get to clarity, the better it works for me. And the people who have succeeded have been clear, and this is a challenge I'm working on myself, but I think a lot of people do. But if you can do that, everything else will follow. And don't get distracted until you've done that. So don't start taking courses on social media, or how to write your book, or how to launch a rocket ship, or how to build a website until you know exactly what you're trying to do, and then have everything follow that guiding Northstar Guiding Light.

Kate:

And we often talk here about eliminating the "Can't" by figuring out the "How" so you can live your "Why". And I feel of the many people that we've interviewed, boy you are living that. And I really appreciate also that message for us to hear. And for our listeners. Whatever you are, you are so lean into it, it might be your greatest asset. And I do think that a perceived weakness, if you can kind of embrace it, it often becomes a strength or it's the catalyst to change and go after what you want. That, this has been a very helpful conversation for sure.

Linda:

Absolutely.

Kate:

I have been tasked with the most terrible part of our podcast, which is being the timekeeper. Which we could talk for hours and hours. Maybe we need a follow up podcast, but we are coming to the end of our time together. But before we go, what is next for you, Michael.

Michael Whitehouse:

So the big thing I'm working on right now is launching my Inner Circle program, which people can find at guywhoknowsaguy.com/innercircle. And on that website, there's two buttons; one is sign up for the program, which I mentioned earlier in the podcast, and the others sign up for a call. Because people don't always want to sign up before they actually get to talk to me. And on that call, they could actually get 10 to 30 minutes with me bringing their challenge to me. And I will bring my big treasure chest full of stuff, and whatever their challenges in, as I mentioned, pretty much any field, I will work on that. And if they'll not call they say I want more of this, they can join the Inner Circle, which at this point is a rocket ship and a plain brown paper wrapper. So, it's not price like it should be, which is the best time to get something- before it has the marketing built around it. So if they go to guywhoknowsaguy.com/innercircle, then I I'd love to have a conversation with them and learn about their challenges and see if there's some solutions in my treasure chest.

Linda:

Thank you Michael. Thank you so much. For this conversation today, and I will say from someone who knows Michael, in the publishing industry and we are publishing community magazines, he is super diligent about sticking to his goals. He's a big go getter. He's got a big heart. He made a morning podcast for us specific to the publishing industry, and it was amazing. I listen to it every single day, and ot started to really take off in the company, and so he's really got a big heart and he just really wants to help people and he's a spectacular human. So thank you so much for being here.

Rhonda:

Thank you Michael. And it's been said, but we want you to definitely learn about Michael Wightehouse and go to www.guywhoknowsaguy.com

Kate:

Is that where we can find out about your morning motivational?

Michael Whitehouse:

Yes, yes, you go to guywhoknowsaguy.com, there's a link to both of the podcasts. There's the Contact Me button and a link to my book as well; The Guy Who Knows a Guy.

Kate:

I should say a special thanks to our talented and skilled producer behind the scenes, Kathy Carswell.

Rhonda:

And so it is left for me to say, Go forth, be brave, live well, and do good because it's Act Two, You're On!